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A Collection of Ordinances and Regulations for the Government of the Royal Household, made in divers reigns. From King Edward III to King William and Queen Mary. Also Receipts in Ancient Cookery -

1790 - Printed for the Society of Antiquaries by John Nichols, London - First Edition
A fine example of this important collection of ordinances and regulations on the stewardship of the Royal House of England.

‘Most of these texts appear here for the first time from manuscripts preserved in various English libraries (Harleian, Cotton, the Society of Antique Dealers, Thomas Astle, etc). They form a source of first-rate information about table manners, protocol, menus, feasts, official holidays, table and cellar service, expense accounts, lists of the officers of fine dining, of the wardrobe, etc. and contain numerous pieces of information about all the products used in the royal kitchens, the grocery stores, kitchen gardens, farmyards, Crown breweries, about the composition of breakfasts, dinners, suppers and princes’ snacks, about the names, salaries and roles of the staff.

At the end of these prescriptions, pages 423 to 476 are dedicated to a ‘
Collection of Old English Recipes’, extracts from a manuscript from the Arundel Collection, kept in the Royal Society library. This manuscript dates from the 15th century but the recipes could be a lot older. It is undoubtedly the ‘Oldest Culinary Recipe Book’ in England. The spelling of the manuscript has been preserved.

This important and rare publication was carried out at the expense of the
Society of Antique Dealers in London. It is a collection of 20 texts, ordinances, edicts etc, from the 15th century to the end of the 17th century, concerning the functioning of the English Royal Household from the reign of Edward III until 1689, by way of Henry VI (1455), Prince Edward (1474), Edward IV’s Black Book of the Royal Household, the house of George Duke of Clarence in 1469, Henry VIII in 1526; Queen Elizabeth, King James in 1604, etc.’ [Oberlé] 
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Price HK$ 5,000



Abbey's Road - Inscribed - Edward Abbey, Jean Pruchnik (illustrator)

1979 - E. P. Dutton, New York - First Edition
A fine first edition, illustrated by Jean Pruchnik, signed and inscribed ‘all the best! Edward Abbey Santa Fe 11/56/88

‘In the spirit of
Desert Solitaire and The Journey Home, Abbey's Road is a personal odyssey. Edward Abbey's explorations include the familiar territory of the Rio Grande in Texas and Canyonlands National Park and Lake Powell in Utah. He also takes us to such varied places as Scotland, the interior of Australia, and the Sierra Madre and Isla de la Sombra in Mexico.’

‘I've been along a few of Mr. Abbey's roads. He sees much more than I did. Indeed, reading him is often better than being there was.’ – John Leonard.

‘Abbey's the original fly in the ointment. Give him money and prizes. Don't let anything happen to him.’ – Thomas McGuane.
 
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Price HK$ 6,000



The Journey Home: Some Words in Defense of the American West - Signed - Edward Abbey, Jim Stiles (illustrator)

1977 - Dutton, New York - First Edition
A bright fresh first edition of Abbey’s first major non-fiction work since Desert Solitaire, signed by him to the title page, and illustrated by Jim Stiles.

‘Alive with ranchers, dam builders, kissing bugs and mountain lions. In a voice edged with inner chagrin, he offers a portrait of the American West what we'll not soon forget, offering us the observations of a man who left the urban world behind to think about the natural world and the myths buried therein’.
 
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Price HK$ 3,000



The Okavango River - Charles John Andersson

1861 - Hurst and Blackett, London - First Edition
With engraved frontispiece, engraved extra title page, and fifteen further engraved plates.

A scarce example in original publisher’s cloth, of Swedish explorer, hunter, trader and naturalist Charles John Andersson’s second book, describing his hunting expeditions through Namaqualand and Damaraland (Namibia). Andersson intended to explore these countries right up to Cunene or Nourse River but the difficulties of the expedition, though encountered with indomitable courage, proved to be insuperable, and he had to turn back. He obtained, however, much valuable information and his success as a hunter and collector was unique in this part of the continent. The coast-line of South-West Africa is carefully described and there is an interesting account of the once-famed guano island, Ichaboe.’ – Mendelssohn.

Charles John (Karl Johan) Andersson (1827-67) - The Swedish explorer, hunter, trader and naturalist Charles John Andersson was born on 4 March, 1827 in Vårmland, Sweden, and died on 9 July, 1867 in Angola. He was the illegitimate son of Llewellyn Lloyd (1792– 1876), a British bear hunter, and his Swedish servant. Andersson grew up in Sweden, where he hunted with his father and started to collect natural history objects. In the years 1847–1849 he studied in Lund. In 1849 he went to London, hoping to sell his natural history collection in order to finance his travels. There he met Francis Galton (1822–1911), and they decided to make a joint expedition to Southern Africa. In June 1850 they arrived at the Cape and travelled from there to Walvis Bay by boat. They went far inland on their expedition, aiming to reach Lake Ngami, which had been discovered not long before by David Livingstone (1813–1873), but were unsuccessful. Galton then returned to England, but Andersson remained in Africa and finally managed to reach Lake Ngami from Namibia in 1853.

In 1853 he returned to London, where he eventually published
Lake Ngami (1854), the record of his two expeditions. He returned to Africa the same year, 1854. For a short time he worked as a manager of a number of mines in Namibia, but he preferred to continue his explorations, reaching the Okavango river in 1859 (The Okavango River, 1861).

Next he went to Cape Town where he married and then settled with his wife in Otjimbingwe in central Namibia (then South-West Africa), where Andersson made a living as a breeder of cattle and a trader. In 1867 he travelled north, to the Portuguese settlements in Angola, in the hope of opening up a better route of communication with Europe. However, he did not manage to cross the Kunene River and had to return. On his way back he died after a short illness, and was buried by his companion. After his death his wife and children went to live in Cape Town. His
Notes of Travel (1875) were posthumously published by his father. Andersson had collected some 400 species of birds on his travels; his notes on the ornithology of Namibia were published posthumously as Notes on the birds of Damaraland and the adjacent territories of South-West Africa (1872).’ – Anne S. Troelstra, Bibliography of Natural History Travel Narratives (Wallis 1936). 
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Price HK$ 18,000



A Voyage Round the World, In the Years MDCCXL, I, II, III, IV. - George Anson, Richard Walter

1748 - Printed for the Author, London - First Edition
A finely bound ‘Royal Paper’ copy of this beautifully illustrated work which ‘has long occupied a distinguished position as a masterpiece of descriptive travel’ (Hill), and ‘a model of what such literature should be’ (Cox).

Containing forty-two copper-engraved maps, charts, views, and coastal profiles, all but one folding, including views of Brazilian harbours and cities, Acapulco, Tenian, Port St. Julian, Magellan’s Straits, the Bay of Manila, Saipan, Lama, Lantau, Chinese junks, and others, and large folding maps of South America, the Philippines, and the Pacific Ocean, as well as a twelve-page subscriber list, and the two-page instructions to the binder.

England, at war with Spain in 1739, equipped eight ships under the command of George Anson to harass the Spaniards on the western coast of South America for the purpose of cutting off Spanish supplies of wealth from the Pacific area. Seven ships were lost and of 900 men 600 perished. As usual, scurvy took an appalling toll.

The Spanish fleet sent to oppose the British ran into storms; provisions ran out and many ships were wrecked. Thus the primary objective of the expedition was not attained. Anson, however, continued taking prizes off the Pacific coast during 1741-42, and in June 1743, near the Philippines, he captured the Spanish galleon
Nostra Seigniora de Cabadonga and its treasure of £400,000 sterling, which allowed Anson and the surviving members of his crew to reach England much the richer. 
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Price HK$ 59,000



Real Sailor-Songs - John Ashton (Editor)

1891 - The Leadenhall Press, London - First Edition
A magnificent and large folio, containing 129 historical naval songs in full page and broadsheet format, charmingly illustrated with over 200 engravings.

One third of the songs celebrate the great British naval victories up to the end of the 18th century, the balance gathered under the headings of - ‘Press Gang’, ‘Disaster’, ‘Ashore’, ‘Love’, and ‘Miscellaneous’.
 
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Price HK$ 6,000



The Splendid Idle Forties. Stories of Old California - Gertrude Atherton, Harrison Fisher (illustrator)

1902 - The Macmillan Company, New York - First Edition
‘Perhaps the best known collection of stories of that romantic period of California history when the incoming Americans were first intermingling with the Californians of rancho and presidio...’ – The Zamorano 80: A Selection of Distinguished California Books Made by Members of the Zamorano Club.

A fine bright example, of this collection of short stories, illustrated with eight plates by Harrison Fisher.

‘The finest stories ever written about early California’ – Phil Townsend Hanna.

The stories are:
The Pearls of Loreto; The Ears of Twenty Americans; The Washtub Mail; The Conquest of Dona Jacoba; A Ramble with Eulogia; The Isle of Skulls; The Head of a Priest; La Perdida; Lukari's Story; Natalie Ivanhoff: A Memory of Fort Ross; The Vengeance of Padre Arroyo; The Bells of San Gabriel; and When the Devil was Well. 
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Price HK$ 3,500



A Pilgrimage To Nejd - Lady Anne Blunt

1881 - John Murray, London - First Edition
First edition of the second of Lady Blunt’s two classic travel accounts, in publisher’s original gilt pictorial cloth, and describing the journey that she and her husband, the poet Wilfrid Scawen Blunt, made in the winter of 1878–7, across the Nejd from Beirut, south into the Great Nefud, north to Baghdad and east to the Persian Gulf. Lady Anne was the first European woman to reach the Nejd and, together with her husband, they were the first Europeans to enter the Jebel Shammar in the Nejd. At Hail they met the Emir who received them courteously, having recently knifed his nephew and cut off the feet of his cousins, leaving them to bleed to death.

With over 30 black and white illustrations including fifteen wood-engraved plates, and large folding colour map.

‘To find out how the Bedouin lived, Lady Anne lived like one herself: she became a temporary nomad, riding the two thousand miles from the Mediterranean to the Persian Gulf for the most part in Arab dress, and without guides or the usual caravan. This was quite an innovation, and prompted Blunt to dub his wife ‘the first bona-fide tourist who has taken the Euphrates road'. - Jane Robinson,
Wayward Women. 
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Price HK$ 12,000



 
Results 1 - 8 of 78 results