Results 65 - 72 of 145 results

The Punishments of China - Major George Henry Mason

1823 - Printed for William Miller by W. Bulmer and Co., London - Early Printing
A fine copy in magnificent contemporary binding, containing a series of twenty two hand-coloured stipple engravings by Dadley based on paintings attributed to the artist George Henry Mason who, with William Alexander, travelled to China at the end of the eighteenth century. Each plate is accompanied by a descriptive text leaf.

The best western record of these peculiar and often gruesome practices, describing in graphic detail the forms of punishment from less severe penalties like
Torturing the Fingers and Twisting a Man’s Ears, to the most serious The Manner of Beheading. The accompanying text, in both French and English, explains the method by which the punishment is delivered and examples of the crimes that would merit such a punishment. For example the fitting punishment for merchants that had committed frauds, impositions, or any other unwarrantable tricks of the trade was the Punishment of the Swing, in which a man is suspended by his shoulders and ankles, in a very painful situation. [Wittockiana 49]

While the methods are clearly barbaric by today's standards, Mason's book, along with the translation of the Qing penal code in 1810, created growing concern in Britain and other Western countries over the perceived severity and unnecessary cruelty of the sentences described. [Abbey]
 
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Price HK$ 22,000



The Treaty Ports of China and Japan. A Complete Guide to the Open Ports of Those Countries, Together with Peking, Yedo, Hongkong and Macao. Forming a Guide Book & Vade Mecum for Travellers, Merchants, and Residents in General. - Wm. Fred. Mayers, N.B. Dennys, Chas King.

1867 - Trübner & Co. / A. Shortrede and Co., London / Hong Kong - First and only edition
As trade between the East and the West grew in the mid-nineteenth century, increasing numbers of Westerners travelled to China and Japan, and in 1867 this guide to the key port cities such as Hong Kong and Nagasaki was published in both Hong Kong and London. Its editor, Nicholas Belfield Dennys (1813-1899) claimed it was the first such comprehensive handbook printed for public distribution. Intended for visitors and new residents, the guide was originally typeset in China, allowing place names and other words to be printed in Chinese characters.

The book includes physical descriptions and brief histories of twenty three Chinese cities and six Japanese cities, details of schools and libraries, population statistics and much practical information, as well as a list of other publications on China and Japan. Published shortly after the major expansion in Treaty Ports effected by the Second Opium War in China (1858 -1860) and the Harris Treaty in Japan (1858).

A complete copy of this rare guide book, a fascinating and detailed study of 23 ports in China and 6 in Japan, The 28 fragile and specially commissioned maps, engraved in China, 27 of which are printed in red, are almost invariably missing from the few copies which turn up. In addition to the invaluable maps, the book is a mine of information on every imaginable facet of China. It is also one of the best early sources of information on Hong Kong.
 
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Price HK$ 45,000



Illustrated Catalogue of the “Maze Collection” of Chinese Junk Models in the Science Museum, London, 1938 - Sir Frederick Maze

1939 - Science Museum, London [printed Shanghai]
A rare work detailing the unique collection of ten large-scale models of Chinese junks, presented to the Science Museum, London, by Sir Frederick Maze, inspector-general of Chinese customs in 1938. The models were built in Hong-Kong or Shanghai by Chinese craftsmen, under the supervision of George C.L. Worcester and are accurate replicas of these sailing craft in every detail, down to the shrines and household gods. They include examples with the magical eye on the prow.

Illustrated with 18 large photographic plates, detailing the ten junks of the collection and the Fukien Sea-Going Junk model donated to the Musée de la Marine in Paris.

This copy comes with three additional loose original photographs, property of the Science Museum, titled in pencil on the back: ‘
Chinese Lorcha’ (see ‘Lorcha’ plate), ‘Chinese Fish Carrying Boat from Ming Po, Broadside’ and ‘Hylain junk from China Draught and sail plan’ (see ’Model of Hainan Sea-going Junk’ plate and appendix 6). The work is missing the plate of the ‘South-China Sea-Going Junk’,

A presentation copy ‘
With the compliments of Sir Frederick Maze, Inspector General of Chinese Maritime Customs and Administrator of the Chinese Lighthouse Department. 1929-1943.’ We believe copies of this work were printed in a small number for Sir Frederick Maze, and the only other copy we have seen includes the same compliments slip. 
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Price HK$ 15,000



The Indian Alps and How We Crossed Them - Nina Elizabeth Mazuchelli

1876 - Longmans, London - First Edition
A handsome volume of this enduring work on mountaineering, the enthusiastic and irrepressible narrative of Nina Elizabeth Mazuchelli who, together with her Army chaplain husband, Francis, and their friend ‘C’ (the District Officer) traversed the Nepal-Sikkim frontier along the Singalila Ridge – they almost reached the Tibetan border before a blizzard forced them to turn back. Despite their retreat, Mrs Mazuchelli was the first English woman to travel so far into the eastern Himalayas.

Profusely illustrated with 10 full page chromolithographic plates and numerous in-text drawings and sketches by the author, together with a folding map of Sikkim, the travelling party’s route marked in colour.
 
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Price HK$ 7,000



A Short Account of the remarkable clock made by James Cox in the Year 1766 by Order of the East India Company for the Emperor of China - William Meyrick

1868 - Printed by Wertheimer, London - One of three known copies.
One of only three copies believed to have been printed, Illustrated with a full page engraving of the clock, and four engraved in-text vignettes.

James Cox, a most prolific clock and watchmaker of the late seventeenth century was commissioned by the East India Company in 1766 to produce a pair of elaborate clockwork automata as a gift for the Qianlong Emperor (1711-99). This is the rare privately published account of one of the pair, which is now housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the second piece has never been found.

Each clock was made of gold in the form of a chariot embellished with rubies and diamonds (dimensions of the remaining clock at the Met - 26 × 16.2 × 8.3 cm). A woman sits atop the chariot with one arm resting on the clock, the face of which is signed ‘Jas Cox London”. A small bird that flutters rests on the finger of one hand; in the other is a circular rotating ornamental piece atop a fluted rod. A double umbrella is mounted overhead, surmounted by a jewelled dragon. At the front of a chariot by the feet of the female figure sits a dog made of gold; nearby two small birds (which are attached to springs) pop up and appear to fly away from the chariot. A small figure of a man in Oriental dress supports one end of the chariot as if pushing it.
 
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Price HK$ 180,000



The Englishman in China during the Victorian Era - Alexander Michie

1900 - William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh and London - First Edition
A clean bright original and thus scarce set of this important and detailed work covering the second half of the nineteenth century. With interesting provenance, from the library of Villiers Alwyne Caesar Hawkins, who was with the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank in Hong Kong (1882-1907), became director of the Imperial Bank of Persia (1908-193), and was also appointed a director of Hongkong Bank in 1911.

Sir Rutherford Alcock was a British army surgeon and later an accomplished Far Eastern diplomat, Alexander Michie was a successful Scottish trader, firstly with Lindsay & Co., and later as an agent for Jardine Matheson, he edited newspapers, authored several books, and also acted as Chairman of the Shanghai Chamber of Commerce.

Profusely illustrated with thirty full page black and white plates, three black and white maps, a large colour folding map at the rear of volume II, and a number of vignettes throughout the text.
 
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Price HK$ 9,000



Old Burma - Eight Works on Burma in Four Volumes - U Myo Min, Taw Sein Ko, Ma (Daw) Mya Sein, F. Haskings, U Tun Pe, et al.

1938 - 1949 - Various, Various - Various
Eight works on Burma bound into four charming volumes for Charles Booth, British diplomat who served in Burma three times between 1950 and 1978.

A compilation of memoir, history, and tourist guides to Burma, these books are profusely illustrated with maps, photographic plates, and illustrations, and will provide wonderful material for armchair travellers, and nostalgia to those who have already visited Burma.
 
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Price HK$ 2,500



Glimpses of China and Chinese Homes - Edward S. Morse

1902 - Little, Boston - First Edition
A fine copy, ‘Illustrated from Sketches in the Author's Journal’.

Zoologist and orientalist with in-depth knowledge of Japanese ceramics and customs, travelled through China whilst keeping this ‘Journal’ in which he mostly outlines his views on the superiority of the Japanese in matters of municipal, military and culture, obviously a considerable bias based upon his years spent in Japan and love of that country. However, some of his points may have some bases of fact, with the luxury lifestyle and corruption that was seen amongst the senior military Chinese figures at the time.

An interesting counterpoint to works by Morse’s contemporary Western sinologists, and the sketches are rather good.
 
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Price HK$ 1,800



 
Results 65 - 72 of 145 results